Kat's Tips 3 – The Best of the Web (1) - How Experts Debate!

Kat's Tips 3 – The Best of the Web (1) - How Experts Debate!

文章Kat C » 週四 12月 16, 2010 7:04 am

Some people argue that when learning a language (or anything, really), we should learn from the best. With the vast amount of resources (and junk!) one finds on the Internet we should be more discriminating - and careful. I'd like to recommend a few sites that offer great writing as well as useful information. Starting with one of my favorite European Magazines - The Economist.

The site has a lot to offer, but I specifically want to focus on their regular "Debate" section. They invite two experts (often professors) on any given topic to argue for or against an assertion, and encourage readers to join in. Go to this site and click on "JOIN THIS LIVE DEBATE" and start with the opening statements.

This week they are doing a very fitting topic for English learners: Does the language we speak shape how we think?

You may find a lot of words you don't know. Refrain from looking anything up until you've read all three opening remarks. Think about the issue and decide which side you fall on. THEN go back to either re-read the remarks (preferably at least three times) or look up those words. Don't get hung up on individual words or sentences. If you have a general idea why two sides disagree, you've gotten enough out of it!

The reading will not be easy, but just give it a try. It is written by experts for the general public. THIS IS GREAT ENGLISH!

Here's the link:
http://www.economist.com/debate/overview/190
最後由 Kat C 於 週一 1月 10, 2011 2:17 pm 編輯,總共編輯了 1 次。
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Kat C
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Re: Kat's Tips 3 – The Best of the Web (1) - How Experts Debate!

文章Sherry Liao » 週五 12月 24, 2010 11:57 pm

Kat C 寫:You may find a lot of words you don't know. Refrain from looking anything up until you've read all three opening remarks. Think about the issue and decide which side you fall on. THEN go back to either re-read the remarks (preferably at least three times) or look up those words. Don't get hung up on individual words or sentences. If you have a general idea why two sides disagree, you've gotten enough out of it!


I am curious about what the difference is between re-reading articles several times and looking up in dictionaries for new words after the first read, and how it effects English learning.

Recently I found that my reading habits have changed with the development of technology. When I was a student, looking up in paper dictionaries for new words was sort of killing me, and at that time we were told to try to “guess” the meaning of a new word from its context when reading English articles. In recent years, reading with computers has become a pleasing experience thanks to the advanced translation software and electronic dictionaries. Therefore, I almost always looked up the unfamiliar words when I was doing a second read.

These months I have built up a new habit of reading on my smartphone. When reading on the 3.5-inch mobile screen whenever I have one minute free time or two, I just don’t want to bother to look up in dictionaries. Now I switch back to my old habit of repeatly reading an article several times without looking up the meaning of new words.
Sherry Liao
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